Maintain Fire Fighting Equipment To Ensure Prolonged Safety

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

Fire fighting is a difficult job, and involves taking a lot of real time risks that every fire fighter will attest to. The reality, though, is that not everyone can be a fire fighter, however, if preliminary fire fighting equipment is installed in a home or office, this can be a lifesaver in times of accidental fire outbreaks. These products protect people and property during fire mishaps; and when duly installed, people feel safer in their homes and workplaces. Therefore, fire fighting equipment is immensely important, and is absolutely necessary for the safekeeping of home and office dwellers by ensuring optimal fire protection. However, only installation of fire equipment is not enough to ensure fire safety. Their regular inspection and maintenance also plays a crucial role in ensuring prolonged fire safety and prevention of any accidents that can cause extensive damage to life or property.

Click the link for particulars about passive fire protection systems

Various Fire Equipment To Maintain:

Any fire equipment installed in a home needs to be fully functional and must be capable of providing safety for a long duration of time with relatively good maintenance. Maintenance is the only way to ensure optimal functionality of these commodities; and for that purpose, frequent inspections including monthly and quarterly fire safety inspections are absolutely necessary. Ask fire suppliers and servicing houses for the contacts of experts and professionals who can visit your home or office at regular time intervals to inspect and keep an eye on the equipment. The fire equipment that is usually checked by professionals include:

  • Fire alarms
  • Fire signs
  • Sprinkler machines
  • Fire extinguishers
  • Emergency lighting
  • Dry, aerosol or foam extinguishers
  • Fire hydrants
  • Smoke control system
  • Fire doors

Various above-mentioned items can be purchased from various fire fighting equipment suppliers. The most important step is to choose a reliable supplier, and to purchase best quality goods, rather than just hunting for cheap options. Fire safety is a serious issue and hence no compromise on quality of objects should be made. Extend your budget, if needed, however, this can be avoided if you do ample market research, since there are many good fire equipment suppliers who offer exciting deals on high standard products that are known to be the best in the market.

Subscribing to fire fighting equipment inspection plan:

Any standard maintenance routine involves 24/7 support for fire equipment servicing. Any maintenance plan provided by a fire servicing professional must include inspection of fire safety objects, timely detection of worn out parts and their immediate replacements, and disposal of faulty parts. A comprehensive plan covers all charges including experts’ attendance, replacement of parts, and so on. Minor and major replacements must be covered under a comprehensive maintenance plan. There are a number of service providers who offer professional fire equipment maintenance services. Subscribing to a useful monthly or quarterly plan is a good way to ensure fire safety of your building.

Fire extinguisher maintenance services:

Probably the most important equipment in your fire fighting arsenal is the fire extinguisher which comes in many types, such as CO2 extinguisher, foam based fire extinguisher, and gaseous and liquid extinguishers. Since it is a key fire fighting equipment it should be checked and maintained regularly to ensure optimal operation of such equipment. Use the services of a professional to check its pressure limits, any signs of corrosion or damages, and need for refill or replacement to ensure that these devices are in working condition and will be able to deliver the best performance when the need arises and not fail at the last moment.

Maintenance professionals often keep a track record of their services, and such records must be examined before you decide to sign up with anyone, no matter how reputed they may appear at first glance.

There should be no compromise to fire safety and fire fighting equipment even if it is expensive. Do your research well in advance, and buy good quality equipment from the most reliable suppliers of fire fighting equipment. Subscribe to a fire fighting equipment inspection plan to make sure that your fire extinguishers are checked by professionals regularly and are ready to use in case of a fire.

Planning for Your Child’s Educational Future

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

It might seem like a long way off, but it pays to begin planning for the costs your child’s education as soon as possible. The cost of education is easy to underestimate and, with prices rising all the time, the earlier you start preparing, the more options your children will have as they progress. Even if your child is older, it’s never too late to embark on some sort of savings plan.

Visit financial strategy sydney for more information specifically

Starting early:

Before you begin to plan, you’ll want to get an idea of what kinds of costs are involved. If you choose a private education along with university, you could end up paying up to £300,000 in tuition. Options like boarding school will make that price even higher. To understand what the costs might be when your child goes to school, it’s useful to obtain information on the private institutions in your area and study their yearly fee increases. Even if you don’t go private, a state school still has many associated costs, including school uniforms, equipment and excursions.

University has always been a significant expense for families – and, in the current economic climate, those costs are set to rise. In addition to tuition, universities carry other expenses – such as housing and maintenance.

While it’s easy to worry about how to pay for all levels of education, there are a range of options available to help you and your children deal with the financial impact.

Choosing to pay:

Once you’ve established an idea about what kind of education you want for your children, you may choose to pay for it as and when the costs present themselves. Options available include:

Using your own income: if you choose to pay for your child’s education using your own income, be prepared to face a financial sacrifice. If you feel you can afford this, make sure you have enough money to cover the day to day costs of your child’s course – and face unforeseen problems like unemployment

Remortgaging: replacing your existing mortgage in a way which leaves you financially better off through lower payments or released equity. This approach requires detailed research and a close examination of just how much you will pay in the long term.

Loans: taking out a loan and paying back what you owe in fixed monthly payments suits many parents’ budgets. It’s worth thinking very carefully about getting into debt to pay for your child’s education.

Choosing to save:

If you’re inclined to embark on a savings plan to finance the cost of education, more options are open to you. These include:

· Stocks and shares

· Equity based savings

· Savings accounts

· Bonds

· ISAs

· Child Trust Funds

A savings plan is a long term approach but may suit your family’s lifestyle and prove a more financial strategy. As with all savings plans, you should seek advice before deciding what kind of route you’re going to take. Trust funds, for example, are available in a variety of categories and come with their own sets of requirements and regulations.

Deck Building and Ponds: Helping Nature Meet Our Needs

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

The great outdoors can rejuvenate our body and our spirits. There is nothing better after a long hard day at work in the proverbial concrete jungle than rejuvenate your spirit from your deck. Just imagine being able to chill out on your deck, watching the wildlife than surrounds your pond. A deck overlooking a pond will also enhance the property value of your home. There are countless options available for deck building and ponds.

More on brisbane decks here

Prior to building anything, be sure to check if you need a permit to build. You can inquire from the local planning board and find out what permits may be necessary. The laws can vary vastly from one city to then next one. If you are in violation of any laws, the fines can be very expensive. Some places may even demand that the pond or deck be destroyed if they were built without the required permission.

Next, determine your budget. While it may be true that you would love to be the envy of the entire neighborhood, make sure that your plans stay within your designated budget. In deck building and ponds, bigger is not always better. If you happen to go over your budget while deck building, your pond could be scaled down to a smaller size. You could opt to save the expense and hassle of digging a large hole in the yard and simply let a fiberglass pond rest above the ground. Don’t settle for the first handy man you come across. Shop around. Know what your are getting. Ask for references and pictures of completed projects. Are the jobs completed within a reasonable amount of time? There is nothing worse than having everything torn up and started, with no end in site. Make sure you have reasonable expectations.

Next you will want to make plans determining where and what size the deck building and ponds will be. Study a lot of material about deck building and ponds. Search for Do It Yourself and home improvement web sites. Ask a lot of questions. Do you see any pictures of decks with pond combinations that you admire? When you see one in your neighborhood that you like, perhaps you can obtain the name of who built it from the homeowner. There are so many designs and different materials that you can choose from. Take the time to look at many varieties of deck building and ponds prior to making any kind of design decision.

You may want to consider hiring a licensed contractor. You would choose a contractor for your deck building and ponds installation just as you would choose one for any other job. You will ask family members, friends and associates for recommendations. Check references. Inquire about the warranty. Be sure to check if there are any complaints with the Better Business Bureau. Find out if your state of residence requires that all contractors be licensed. If that is a requirement find out if the hold a current license. Are they bonded and insured?

If you have the inclination, you could do the deck building and ponds installation yourself. This can be very hard work but also extremely gratifying. Most importantly when doing your deck building and ponds installation enjoy the process and you will love the outcome.

Source: Free Articles from ArticlesFactory.com

Become a Better Presenter in 3 Easy Steps

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

Big investor pitch coming up? Do you have a critical client presentation next week? With 3 easy steps, creating masterful presentations is faster than you’ve ever imagined.

It’s not just about getting all the stuff together: the slides, handouts and charts. If that were all it took to give a good presentation – more slides, more handouts – then you could give the list to a summer intern and head out to the beach instead of slaving over your deck.

Visit presentation skills training for more information specifically

But if you’ve ever given a presentation that didn’t go quite how you planned (or seriously bombed) you probably know that kicking the tires in the parking lot is not the best solution.

Far too many business people wait too long before asking for help. If you want to improve your skills, start now. Ask for help from colleagues. Take a presentation skills course. Don’t go it alone.

There are times to talk wide and far to everyone about your plans and business. And there are times to protect it. Often before a big pitch or public talk, it’s a good idea to opt for silence and protect yourself from criticism.

The only problem with this approach is this: if you keep your presentation to yourself, you won’t get any objective feedback. This makes it hard to get expert coaching, input, and advice. It makes it impossible to refine the presentation you have in mind so it really hits the mark.

So, I truly understand this deep desire to keep things under wraps before the big day. But I urge you to find a trusted advisor. This could be a mentor, friend or objective presentation coach. Pick someone who is non-judgmental and ready to give you candid feedback.

With this in hand, you are ready to prepare, rehearse and refine your presentation. Use these 3 quick and easy tips and you’ll set yourself up for success.

Step 1. Get Input on Your Story It’s easy to get carried away with your story. Especially when you get a brainstorm at 3am and see everything perfectly while sitting in the moonlight. It’s just so darn easy to get all the pieces lined up but then not really pull the thread of connection all the way through.

That’s why it’s very helpful to get outside input. If your mentor or coach can understand your story easily, you’re on the right track. If they get lost or confused, that’s a good sign that you need to do some more work.

Step 2. Rehearse Your Presentation Rehearse mentally. Rehearse verbally. Rehearse with movement and whiteboard sketches. Practice. And then practice again.

The best way to practice is to rehearse in an environment that is approximately like the one where you’ll do your final presentation. This helps you get ready for logistical details, space arrangements and room set up.

Hint: If you only practice in your bathroom in front of the mirror, you won’t know how it feels to be standing in front of 10 or 100 people.

Step 3. Listen To Input Once you’re working with your coach, be sure to listen. Don’t be one of those arrogant and cocky presenters who don’t truly listen.

Pay attention. What is your coach telling you? Should you talk louder? Is your voice deep and resonant? Are you showing a combination of poise and purposeful leadership?

Whatever feedback and coach gives you, write it down. Often in the heat of the moment, it’s easy to nod and listen but forget the details. Take notes! And be sure to read them after your coaching session is over. This will help you integrate and use the feedback for a full benefit.

By working with a trusted advisor, you’ll make rapid progress on your presentation skills. Tackle your tough problems – before you get in front of your audience. You’ll be so glad you did!

News briefs:August 2, 2010

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized
Wikinews Audio Briefs Credits
Produced By
Turtlestack
Recorded By
Turtlestack
Written By
Turtlestack
Listen To This Brief

Problems? See our media guide.

Eight mountaineers missing on Mont Blanc in French Alps after avalanche

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

Sunday, August 24, 2008

Rescue crews have called an end to the search for eight mountaineers who went missing on the French side of Mont Blanc after an avalanche that occurred on at 0100 GMT August 24. Eight other climbers were also injured. Five of the missing are said to be Austrian and three were from Switzerland.

“[There is] no longer any chance of finding someone alive,” stated the interior minister of France, Michele Alliot-Marie who also added that are more people trapped beneath the snow. “Thanks to technology, we know for certain there are people buried under the snow, but it’s impossible to be sure exactly how many.”

Rescuers feared that there would be more avalanches and decided to end the search for survivors in the late afternoon today. The avalanche started at an elevation of 3,600 meters and went down the mountainside for nearly 100 meters, leaving a trail 50 meters wide. Rescuers used helicopters and dogs to search for survivors for a day, but failed to find any.

“[I saw] a wall of ice coming towards us and then we were carried 200 metres,” said one of the survivors from Italy, Marco Delfini who also said he tried to help the others caught in the snow.

There have been many accidents in the Alps this summer, about one hundred climbers have perished since June 1 in France, Italy and Switzerland altogether, of whom about twenty have died on Mont Blanc.

News briefs:May 17, 2010

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized
Wikinews Audio Briefs Credits
Produced By
Turtlestack
Recorded By
Turtlestack
Written By
Turtlestack
Listen To This Brief

Problems? See our media guide.

[edit]

U.S. Senate approves revised bailout package after controversial additions

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

Saturday, October 4, 2008

The U.S. Senate passed a revised bailout bill designed to help the struggling U.S. financial economy, which has measures nearly identical to the bill rejected by the U.S. House of Representatives on Monday.

“Senate Democrats and Republicans believe it is essential that we work quickly on this important legislation to restore confidence to our financial system and strengthen the economy,” said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

The new revisions include raising the FDIC insurance cap to $250,000, a move designed to please progressives. However, the $110 billion in tax breaks, earmarks and what has been called pork barrel spending is not offset by any increases in revenues and has added opposition to the bill from some Representatives in the House.

Earmarks added into the bailout bill included $192 million in tax rebates for the Virgin Islands rum industry, $148 million in tax cuts for the wool industry, $100 million tax cuts to the auto racing industry, and $48 million in Hollywood tax incentives.

Vice President of Taxpayers for Common Sense, Steve Ellis, offered his explanation for the pork and earmarks added in. “People who support some of these provisions will forget about the $700 billion and concerns they may have on that, and say, ‘If you give me a few million in tax breaks for my constituents, I’ll go along'”.

The tactic seems to have worked, however, managing to flip enough votes to pass the bill.

“The inclusion of parity, tax extenders and the FDIC increases has caused me to reconsider my position,” said Representative Jim Ramstad (R Minnesota), who voted against the previous bill on Monday. “All three additions have greatly improved the bill.”

But Representative Marcy Kaptur (D Ohio) was not changing her no vote. “I will not support this legislation because it’s the wrong medicine,” she said.

HAVE YOUR SAY
Do you think the bailout bill will help the US economy, hurt it, or be a waste of money?
Add or view comments

The Senate took H.R.1424, a bill originating in the House concerning “equity in the provision of mental health and substance-related disorder benefits under group health plans, to prohibit discrimination on the basis of genetic information with respect to health insurance and employment,” and extended it with the bailout provisions.

H.R.1424 was introduced on March 9, 2007, by Rep. Patrick Kennedy (RI-1) and had the support of First Lady Rosalind Carter. It is noted on the Congressional Website that “On 10/1/2008, the Senate passed H.R.1424 as the vehicle for the economic rescue legislation. In the EAS version of the bill (Engrossed Amendment as Agreed to by the Senate), Division A (pp.1-110) is referred to as the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008; Division B (pp. 110-255) is referred to as the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008; and Division C (pp. 255-441) is referred to as the Tax Extenders and Alternative Minimum Tax Relief Act of 2008.” It was not treated as an appropriations bill in the House.

There were two votes in the Senate. The first was to amend H.R.1424, which required 3/5 to be accepted, which it was. The second was a vote on the bill. Passage of the Bill required only a 1/2 majority. It was passed with 74 yeas and 25 nays. Senator Kennedy did not vote.

National Museum of Scotland reopens after three-year redevelopment

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

Friday, July 29, 2011

Today sees the reopening of the National Museum of Scotland following a three-year renovation costing £47.4 million (US$ 77.3 million). Edinburgh’s Chambers Street was closed to traffic for the morning, with the 10am reopening by eleven-year-old Bryony Hare, who took her first steps in the museum, and won a competition organised by the local Evening News paper to be a VIP guest at the event. Prior to the opening, Wikinews toured the renovated museum, viewing the new galleries, and some of the 8,000 objects inside.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9
  • 10
  • 11
  • 12

Dressed in Victorian attire, Scottish broadcaster Grant Stott acted as master of ceremonies over festivities starting shortly after 9am. The packed street cheered an animatronic Tyrannosaurus Rex created by Millenium FX; onlookers were entertained with a twenty-minute performance by the Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers on the steps of the museum; then, following Bryony Hare knocking three times on the original doors to ask that the museum be opened, the ceremony was heralded with a specially composed fanfare – played on a replica of the museum’s 2,000-year-old carnyx Celtic war-horn. During the fanfare, two abseilers unfurled white pennons down either side of the original entrance.

The completion of the opening to the public was marked with Chinese firecrackers, and fireworks, being set off on the museum roof. As the public crowded into the museum, the Mugenkyo Taiko Drummers resumed their performance; a street theatre group mingled with the large crowd, and the animatronic Tyrannosaurus Rex entertained the thinning crowd of onlookers in the centre of the street.

On Wednesday, the museum welcomed the world’s press for an in depth preview of the new visitor experience. Wikinews was represented by Brian McNeil, who is also Wikimedia UK’s interim liaison with Museum Galleries Scotland.

The new pavement-level Entrance Hall saw journalists mingle with curators. The director, Gordon Rintoul, introduced presentations by Gareth Hoskins and Ralph Applebaum, respective heads of the Architects and Building Design Team; and, the designers responsible for the rejuvenation of the museum.

Describing himself as a “local lad”, Hoskins reminisced about his grandfather regularly bringing him to the museum, and pushing all the buttons on the numerous interactive exhibits throughout the museum. Describing the nearly 150-year-old museum as having become “a little tired”, and a place “only visited on a rainy day”, he commented that many international visitors to Edinburgh did not realise that the building was a public space; explaining the focus was to improve access to the museum – hence the opening of street-level access – and, to “transform the complex”, focus on “opening up the building”, and “creating a number of new spaces […] that would improve facilities and really make this an experience for 21st century museum visitors”.

Hoskins explained that a “rabbit warren” of storage spaces were cleared out to provide street-level access to the museum; the floor in this “crypt-like” space being lowered by 1.5 metres to achieve this goal. Then Hoskins handed over to Applebaum, who expressed his delight to be present at the reopening.

Applebaum commented that one of his first encounters with the museum was seeing “struggling young mothers with two kids in strollers making their way up the steps”, expressing his pleasure at this being made a thing of the past. Applebaum explained that the Victorian age saw the opening of museums for public access, with the National Museum’s earlier incarnation being the “College Museum” – a “first window into this museum’s collection”.

Have you any photos of the museum, or its exhibits?

The museum itself is physically connected to the University of Edinburgh’s old college via a bridge which allowed students to move between the two buildings.

Applebaum explained that the museum will, now redeveloped, be used as a social space, with gatherings held in the Grand Gallery, “turning the museum into a social convening space mixed with knowledge”. Continuing, he praised the collections, saying they are “cultural assets [… Scotland is] turning those into real cultural capital”, and the museum is, and museums in general are, providing a sense of “social pride”.

McNeil joined the yellow group on a guided tour round the museum with one of the staff. Climbing the stairs at the rear of the Entrance Hall, the foot of the Window on the World exhibit, the group gained a first chance to see the restored Grand Gallery. This space is flooded with light from the glass ceiling three floors above, supported by 40 cast-iron columns. As may disappoint some visitors, the fish ponds have been removed; these were not an original feature, but originally installed in the 1960s – supposedly to humidify the museum; and failing in this regard. But, several curators joked that they attracted attention as “the only thing that moved” in the museum.

The museum’s original architect was Captain Francis Fowke, also responsible for the design of London’s Royal Albert Hall; his design for the then-Industrial Museum apparently inspired by Joseph Paxton’s Crystal Palace.

The group moved from the Grand Gallery into the Discoveries Gallery to the south side of the museum. The old red staircase is gone, and the Millennium Clock stands to the right of a newly-installed escalator, giving easier access to the upper galleries than the original staircases at each end of the Grand Gallery. Two glass elevators have also been installed, flanking the opening into the Discoveries Gallery and, providing disabled access from top-to-bottom of the museum.

The National Museum of Scotland’s origins can be traced back to 1780 when the 11th Earl of Buchan, David Stuart Erskine, formed the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland; the Society being tasked with the collection and preservation of archaeological artefacts for Scotland. In 1858, control of this was passed to the government of the day and the National Museum of Antiquities of Scotland came into being. Items in the collection at that time were housed at various locations around the city.

On Wednesday, October 28, 1861, during a royal visit to Edinburgh by Queen Victoria, Prince-Consort Albert laid the foundation-stone for what was then intended to be the Industrial Museum. Nearly five years later, it was the second son of Victoria and Albert, Prince Alfred, the then-Duke of Edinburgh, who opened the building which was then known as the Scottish Museum of Science and Art. A full-page feature, published in the following Monday’s issue of The Scotsman covered the history leading up to the opening of the museum, those who had championed its establishment, the building of the collection which it was to house, and Edinburgh University’s donation of their Natural History collection to augment the exhibits put on public display.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

Selection of views of the Grand Gallery Image: Brian McNeil.

Closed for a little over three years, today’s reopening of the museum is seen as the “centrepiece” of National Museums Scotland’s fifteen-year plan to dramatically improve accessibility and better present their collections. Sir Andrew Grossard, chair of the Board of Trustees, said: “The reopening of the National Museum of Scotland, on time and within budget is a tremendous achievement […] Our collections tell great stories about the world, how Scots saw that world, and the disproportionate impact they had upon it. The intellectual and collecting impact of the Scottish diaspora has been profound. It is an inspiring story which has captured the imagination of our many supporters who have helped us achieve our aspirations and to whom we are profoundly grateful.

The extensive work, carried out with a view to expand publicly accessible space and display more of the museums collections, carried a £47.4 million pricetag. This was jointly funded with £16 million from the Scottish Government, and £17.8 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund. Further funds towards the work came from private sources and totalled £13.6 million. Subsequent development, as part of the longer-term £70 million “Masterplan”, is expected to be completed by 2020 and see an additional eleven galleries opened.

The funding by the Scottish Government can be seen as a ‘canny‘ investment; a report commissioned by National Museums Scotland, and produced by consultancy firm Biggar Economics, suggest the work carried out could be worth £58.1 million per year, compared with an estimated value to the economy of £48.8 prior to the 2008 closure. Visitor figures are expected to rise by over 20%; use of function facilities are predicted to increase, alongside other increases in local hospitality-sector spending.

Proudly commenting on the Scottish Government’s involvement Fiona Hyslop, Cabinet Secretary for Culture and External Affairs, described the reopening as, “one of the nation’s cultural highlights of 2011” and says the rejuvenated museum is, “[a] must-see attraction for local and international visitors alike“. Continuing to extol the museum’s virtues, Hyslop states that it “promotes the best of Scotland and our contributions to the world.

So-far, the work carried out is estimated to have increased the public space within the museum complex by 50%. Street-level storage rooms, never before seen by the public, have been transformed into new exhibit space, and pavement-level access to the buildings provided which include a new set of visitor facilities. Architectural firm Gareth Hoskins have retained the original Grand Gallery – now the first floor of the museum – described as a “birdcage” structure and originally inspired by The Crystal Palace built in Hyde Park, London for the 1851 Great Exhibition.

The centrepiece in the Grand Gallery is the “Window on the World” exhibit, which stands around 20 metres tall and is currently one of the largest installations in any UK museum. This showcases numerous items from the museum’s collections, rising through four storeys in the centre of the museum. Alexander Hayward, the museums Keeper of Science and Technology, challenged attending journalists to imagine installing “teapots at thirty feet”.

The redeveloped museum includes the opening of sixteen brand new galleries. Housed within, are over 8,000 objects, only 20% of which have been previously seen.

  • Ground floor
  • First floor
  • Second floor
  • Top floor

The Window on the World rises through the four floors of the museum and contains over 800 objects. This includes a gyrocopter from the 1930s, the world’s largest scrimshaw – made from the jaws of a sperm whale which the University of Edinburgh requested for their collection, a number of Buddha figures, spearheads, antique tools, an old gramophone and record, a selection of old local signage, and a girder from the doomed Tay Bridge.

The arrangement of galleries around the Grand Gallery’s “birdcage” structure is organised into themes across multiple floors. The World Cultures Galleries allow visitors to explore the culture of the entire planet; Living Lands explains the ways in which our natural environment influences the way we live our lives, and the beliefs that grow out of the places we live – from the Arctic cold of North America to Australia’s deserts.

The adjacent Patterns of Life gallery shows objects ranging from the everyday, to the unusual from all over the world. The functions different objects serve at different periods in peoples’ lives are explored, and complement the contents of the Living Lands gallery.

Performance & Lives houses musical instruments from around the world, alongside masks and costumes; both rooted in long-established traditions and rituals, this displayed alongside contemporary items showing the interpretation of tradition by contemporary artists and instrument-creators.

The museum proudly bills the Facing the Sea gallery as the only one in the UK which is specifically based on the cultures of the South Pacific. It explores the rich diversity of the communities in the region, how the sea shapes the islanders’ lives – describing how their lives are shaped as much by the sea as the land.

Both the Facing the Sea and Performance & Lives galleries are on the second floor, next to the new exhibition shop and foyer which leads to one of the new exhibition galleries, expected to house the visiting Amazing Mummies exhibit in February, coming from Leiden in the Netherlands.

The Inspired by Nature, Artistic Legacies, and Traditions in Sculpture galleries take up most of the east side of the upper floor of the museum. The latter of these shows the sculptors from diverse cultures have, through history, explored the possibilities in expressing oneself using metal, wood, or stone. The Inspired by Nature gallery shows how many artists, including contemporary ones, draw their influence from the world around us – often commenting on our own human impact on that natural world.

Contrastingly, the Artistic Legacies gallery compares more traditional art and the work of modern artists. The displayed exhibits attempt to show how people, in creating specific art objects, attempt to illustrate the human spirit, the cultures they are familiar with, and the imaginative input of the objects’ creators.

The easternmost side of the museum, adjacent to Edinburgh University’s Old College, will bring back memories for many regular visitors to the museum; but, with an extensive array of new items. The museum’s dedicated taxidermy staff have produced a wide variety of fresh examples from the natural world.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

At ground level, the Animal World and Wildlife Panorama’s most imposing exhibit is probably the lifesize reproduction of a Tyrannosaurus Rex skeleton. This rubs shoulders with other examples from around the world, including one of a pair of elephants. The on-display elephant could not be removed whilst renovation work was underway, and lurked in a corner of the gallery as work went on around it.

Above, in the Animal Senses gallery, are examples of how we experience the world through our senses, and contrasting examples of wildly differing senses, or extremes of such, present in the natural world. This gallery also has giant screens, suspended in the free space, which show footage ranging from the most tranquil and peaceful life in the sea to the tooth-and-claw bloody savagery of nature.

The Survival gallery gives visitors a look into the ever-ongoing nature of evolution; the causes of some species dying out while others thrive, and the ability of any species to adapt as a method of avoiding extinction.

Earth in Space puts our place in the universe in perspective. Housing Europe’s oldest surviving Astrolabe, dating from the eleventh century, this gallery gives an opportunity to see the technology invented to allow us to look into the big questions about what lies beyond Earth, and probe the origins of the universe and life.

In contrast, the Restless Earth gallery shows examples of the rocks and minerals formed through geological processes here on earth. The continual processes of the planet are explored alongside their impact on human life. An impressive collection of geological specimens are complemented with educational multimedia presentations.

Beyond working on new galleries, and the main redevelopment, the transformation team have revamped galleries that will be familiar to regular past visitors to the museum.

Formerly known as the Ivy Wu Gallery of East Asian Art, the Looking East gallery showcases National Museums Scotland’s extensive collection of Korean, Chinese, and Japanese material. The gallery’s creation was originally sponsored by Sir Gordon Wu, and named after his wife Ivy. It contains items from the last dynasty, the Manchu, and examples of traditional ceramic work. Japan is represented through artefacts from ordinary people’s lives, expositions on the role of the Samurai, and early trade with the West. Korean objects also show the country’s ceramic work, clothing, and traditional accessories used, and worn, by the indigenous people.

The Ancient Egypt gallery has always been a favourite of visitors to the museum. A great many of the exhibits in this space were returned to Scotland from late 19th century excavations; and, are arranged to take visitors through the rituals, and objects associated with, life, death, and the afterlife, as viewed from an Egyptian perspective.

The Art and Industry and European Styles galleries, respectively, show how designs are arrived at and turned into manufactured objects, and the evolution of European style – financed and sponsored by a wide range of artists and patrons. A large number of the objects on display, often purchased or commissioned, by Scots, are now on display for the first time ever.

Shaping our World encourages visitors to take a fresh look at technological objects developed over the last 200 years, many of which are so integrated into our lives that they are taken for granted. Radio, transportation, and modern medicines are covered, with a retrospective on the people who developed many of the items we rely on daily.

What was known as the Museum of Scotland, a modern addition to the classical Victorian-era museum, is now known as the Scottish Galleries following the renovation of the main building.

This dedicated newer wing to the now-integrated National Museum of Scotland covers the history of Scotland from a time before there were people living in the country. The geological timescale is covered in the Beginnings gallery, showing continents arranging themselves into what people today see as familiar outlines on modern-day maps.

Just next door, the history of the earliest occupants of Scotland are on display; hunters and gatherers from around 4,000 B.C give way to farmers in the Early People exhibits.

The Kingdom of the Scots follows Scotland becoming a recognisable nation, and a kingdom ruled over by the Stewart dynasty. Moving closer to modern-times, the Scotland Transformed gallery looks at the country’s history post-union in 1707.

Industry and Empire showcases Scotland’s significant place in the world as a source of heavy engineering work in the form of rail engineering and shipbuilding – key components in the building of the British Empire. Naturally, whisky was another globally-recognised export introduced to the world during empire-building.

Lastly, Scotland: A Changing Nation collects less-tangible items, including personal accounts, from the country’s journey through the 20th century; the social history of Scots, and progress towards being a multicultural nation, is explored through heavy use of multimedia exhibits.

Avalanche buries cars in Colorado

Posted by: AiRc8Vhp  :  Category: Uncategorized

Saturday, January 6, 2007

An avalanche on U.S. Route 40, which was 100 feet wide and 15 feet deep, has buried many cars, caused other cars to be pushed over the edge of an expressway, and injured eight people, just outside of Denver, Colorado. The avalanche started at 10:30 AM, starting about 12 miles off Interstate 70, and taking three different paths down the mountain before coming to a stop.

“Our crews said it was the largest they have ever seen. It took three paths,” said a spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Transportation, Stacey Stegman.

All eight (7 adults, 1 minor) have been taken to the St. Anthony Central Hospital in Denver. According to a hospital spokeswoman, all of the victims suffered minor injuries. Seven patients were released on Saturday. There were no casualties.

U.S. route 40 is currently closed to traffic. According to Winter Park spokesman Matt Sugar, there are no plans to close the ski hills. “We’ve gotten calls from all over the country asking if the resort is closed,” he said, “and the answer is no.”

This is the third snow storm to hit the Denver area in three weeks.